L’esprit de l’escalier:

We have all been there.

You are responding to a job interview question or having a spirited debate.

When it is over, and you walk away, that is when you think that perfect response.

And I mean perfect; the mother of all answers; and, proof of your wisdom and powerful intellect.

Except, no one is there to hear you.

The literal translation of L’esprit de l’escalier means “the spirit of the staircase.”

The phrase is attributed to an 18th-century French philosopher who was berated at a party in a Parisian loft.

He left the party, made his way to the ground floor where he looked back up the staircase.

And at that moment he found his wits and came up with the perfect reply.

 

Letting an audience member down

Recently I spoke at the Certified Human Resources Professionals conference.

The workshop was titled: The HR Professional’s Dilemma: Leading When You Have Full Responsibility, But No Authority.

Read how you can bring this workshop to your team

I have to say it went well. The audience was engaged. I felt great.

Then the last question of the session was asked: “What do you do when no one is supporting the project you are trying to get done.”

I gave an okay answer, but not the best answer.

The conference centre is built into a hill, and there are several long escalators to ride as you move through the building.

When I got to the bottom of one escalator, literally and figuratively, L’esprit de l’escalier hit me.

The response I should have given came to me.

I should have responded with a series of questions:

Who’s project is it?

 Is it your project or the organization’s project?

 Has your peer team and leadership team said that the project was vital to achieving the organization’s strategic objectives?

 Because if the project is only your priority and not the whole organization’s project, it will be hard to move it forward.

 If everyone is not pulling together towards success, you will be all alone pushing a rope.

Read about asking better questions

Wasting $20,000

It happened to me.

I had a dream of hosting a high-end conference to promote my organization’s work and establishing us as a world-class centre of excellence.

I put into my team and personal performance objectives and managed to get it into the organization’s strategic plan.

Nice Eh?

Sure-fire success!

But it was only my plan.

My peers and boss seemed okay with it and did nothing to stop me moving this forward.

I made $20K worth of commitments to meeting planners, hotels, and speakers.

And it failed because it wasn’t an organizational objective.

Only mine.

 

The better answer

If the project you are working on does not help your organization meet its strategic objectives.

If it doesn’t help your boss meet their performance objectives.

If it doesn’t support your peers’ objectives

Then you are undertaking a Sisyphean task or are shouting up the staircase.

Read about Sisyphean tasks

So, ask yourself why are you doing it?

2 thoughts on “I wasted $20,000 – The 3 Questions you should asked before you waste money, time and people.

  1. Oh Steve, that whole idea of a light bulb answer after leaving a conversation, is so common. Your insights into leadership are deep. I know your answer will help many leaders who read it here and those in your future audiences.

  2. Steve, smiling all the way! How true-who’s project is it? Does it align with organization’s big picture objectives? We’ve certainly all been there. And then, if you really truly believe in something, take a leap and do it on your own-those that believe in you will follow. Witness Meeting Professionals Against Human Trafficking in just 2 years. Steve, projects are also about passion and sometimes knowing when to leave it all behind. Been there, done that-sound familiar?

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