Do you feel overwhelmed at work?

If the answer’s yes, don’t worry: you’re not alone. Two-thirds of managers say they’re overwhelmed, according to a recent Deloitte survey of 2,500 organizations in 90 countries.

This is a problem, as it is your responsibility, to make sure that the company succeeds.

The result is that managers and leaders take on too much work. A survey by eVoice found that 44% of entrepreneurs reported wearing five or more hats in their business at any given time.

The answer is to delegate more effectively.

Delegate so you can spend more time on strategic decisions.

In fact you should be delegating every task that DOES NOT move you closer to achieving your objectives.

But, how you can decide which tasks to delegate and what you should keep control of yourself.

Jenny Blake in a Harvard Business Review article suggests we conduct an audit using the six T’s to determine what tasks make the most sense to offload:

Tiny: Tasks that are so small they seem inconsequential to tackle, but they add up. They are never urgent, and even if they only take a few minutes, they end up making you out of the flow of more strategic work. For example, registering for a conference or event, adding it to your calendar, and booking the hotel and flight — on their own each of these things may not take much time, but taken together, they all add up.

Tedious: Tasks that are relatively simple are not the best use of your time and can (and should) be handled by anyone but you. For example, manually inputting a 100-item list into a spreadsheet and colour-coding it, or updating the KPIs in your presentation deck.

Time-Consuming: Tasks that, although they may be significant and even somewhat complex, are time-consuming and do not require you to do the initial 80% of research. You can quickly step in when the task is 80% complete and give approval, oversight and direction on next steps.

Teachable: Tasks that, although complicated-seeming at first and possibly comprising several smaller subtasks, can be translated into a system and passed along, with you still providing quality checks and final approval. For example, teaching one of your direct reports how to draft the presentation deck for the monthly all-hands meeting, and even how to be the one to deliver those updates to the team.

Terrible At: Tasks that not only do not fall into your strengths but an area where you feel unequipped. You take far longer than people skilled in this area and still produce a subpar result.  For example, designing those PowerPoint slides for the team meeting.

Time Sensitive: Tasks that are time-sensitive but compete with other priorities; there isn’t enough time to do them all at once, so you delegate an essential and time-sensitive task so that it can be done in parallel to your other project-based deadlines.

Once you have decided what to give away, then learn how by reading “the #1 Secret & 4 Tips You Need To Know To Delegate.”

 

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